Muslims Were a Part of the Founding of America

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President Obama said, during the White House celebration of Ramadan.

“These rituals (i.e. Ramadan) remind us of the principles that we hold in common, and Islam’s role in advancing justice, progress, tolerance and the dignity of all human beings,” Obama said. “Ramadan is a celebration of a faith known for great diversity and racial equality. And here in the United States, Ramadan is a reminder that Islam has always been a part of America.”

As you watch this video of America’s founding and it’s founders watch very closely for all those Muslims that were there at that time, you may have to replay it a time or two in order to catch them being recognized.

visit www.Wallbuilders.com. Encourage your pastor to participate in the Capitol Tour @ Watchmen on the Wall, May 25-27, 2011 in DC. Again, visit www.WatchmenPastors.org and click on events for details.

Pot calls the Kettle Black…

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From the Media Research Center, News Busters…
By Nathan Burchfiel

If you thought media coverage of the Aug. 28 “Restoring Honor” rally hosted in Washington D.C. by Fox News host Glenn Beck seemed like just another attack on conservatives, you’re not alone. As noted by the Daily Caller’s Jim Treacher, much of the coverage had a common thread: describing the crowd as “overwhelmingly white.”

While the term was certainly used in coverage of Beck’s rally, it’s not a new label. “Overwhelmingly white” is a prime example of the media’s groupthink on Beck, Tea Parties, and the conservative movement in general. Virtually every major “mainstream” media outlet has used the phrase in just the past year to describe conservative events.

But even as the media criticize Tea Party and other conservative rallies for an apparent lack of diversity, they struggle to bring minority voices into their own operations.

All three broadcast networks have described the Tea Parties as “overwhelmingly white.” So have CNN, MSNBC, NPR, the Agence France Presse, The Washington Post, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, USA Today, National Journal and US News & World Report. Many of those organizations are the very ones the news industry discusses as having failed to make diversity goals for staff.

Here are a few examples.

  • “The crowds turning out for the Tea Party Express rallies are overwhelmingly white.” - Ed Lavandera, CNN “American Morning” March 31, 2010.
  • “The crowd is still overwhelmingly white.” - Jessica Yellin, CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360″ April 15, 2010.
  • “The crowd that greeted Palin did nothing to contradict the common description of Tea Party supporters as overwhelmingly white and mostly older.” - Ina Jaffe, NPR “Weekend Edition Sunday” March 28, 2010.
  • “They are overwhelmingly white and Anglo …” - USA Today July 2, 2010.

That doesn’t take into account other ways to say the same thing. In coverage of Beck’s rally, some outlets opted for the less aggressive “predominantly white” label, while others described the crowd as “nearly all-white.”

As Brad Wilmouth reported on NewsBusters, ABC’s Tahman Bradley called the crowd “almost all white,” and suggested that presence of Martin Luther King Jr.’s niece, Dr. Alveda King, as a speaker was “an obvious effort to try to show inclusion.”

The charge leveled at conservative demonstrators is especially ironic given the accusers. The media are notoriously “overwhelmingly white.” The American Society of Newspaper Editors reported in April 2010 that minorities total only 13.26 percent of newsroom staff, a decline from the previous year. The report found 465 newspapers have no minorities on their full-time staffs, a number that “has been growing since 2006.”

The organization launched a program in 1978 that “challenged the newspaper industry to achieve racial parity by 2000 or sooner.” It failed. That goal has since been moved to 2025 because, “Over three decades, the annual survey has shown that while there has been progress, the racial diversity of newsrooms does not come close to the fast-growing diversity in the U.S. population as a whole.”

Washington Post ombudsman Andrew Alexander in March reported on internal criticism of the newspaper’s diversity. “All told, journalists of color comprise about 24 percent of the newsroom, comfortably above the ASNE census average of roughly 13 percent in recent years.” However, he added, “Minorities are 43 percent of The Post’s circulation area, and a large part of the region is edging toward ‘majority minority’ status.” So how has the diversity-challenge Post handled the Tea Party?

  • “But, [Tea Party rally attendee Jeff Link] says, looking at the crowd, which is overwhelmingly white and middle-aged, ‘it saddens me not to see this gathering more diverse.’” – Feb. 6, 2010.
  • “The new poll offers a portrait of tea party supporters as overwhelmingly white, mostly conservative and generally disapproving of Obama.” – Feb. 11, 2010
  • “They are overwhelming white (94 percent) and conservative (73 percent).”- April 2, 2010
  • “Tea Party activists, like Perot voters, are overwhelmingly white.” – April 18, 2010

The New York Times reported in January that minority journalists appear to be suffering the most from newsroom cutbacks. But the report on journalism’s diversity issues wasn’t nearly as smug as a Feb. 16 report about Tea Parties:

  • “Gazing out at his overwhelmingly white audience, Mr. Mack felt the need to say, ‘This meeting is not racist.’”

Newspapers aren’t alone. The third annual Television Newsroom Management Diversity Census found that “persons of color” only make up 12.6 percent of staff in TV newsrooms. A 2007 survey by the Radio Television Digital News Association found that minorities make up 21.5 percent of the television news workforce – higher than print but still short of the 34.5 percent of the population. Only 10.2 percent of broadcast news directors are minorities.

But that didn’t stop broadcast outlets from pointing the finger at conservatives.

  • “Do you have any concerns when you look out at the crowds and they’re mostly, well, overwhelmingly white people?” - Terry Moran, ABC “Nightline” Nov. 2, 2009.
  • “You know, one thing to keep in mind about the Tea Party is that it is an overwhelmingly white movement.” - Ron Brownstein, NBC “Meet the Press” April 18, 2010.

The long-running discussion over how to include more minorities in the news media, from introspective articles to industry-insider analysis and advice, seems to have produced less-than-impressive results. Maybe members of the media should recall the old adage about glass houses.

Read more: http://newsbusters.org/blogs/nathan-burchfiel/2010/08/31/overwhelmingly-white-media-criticize-conservative-rallies-overwhel#ixzz0yCqhPPkE

John Kerry, the Richest Legislator..

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I’ve watched my home decrease in value, can’t trade cars…borrowing money is harder than ever, but my congressman, well, he got richer, another raise this year…See the full list at the bottom…from The Hill:

By Kevin Bogardus and Barbra Kim - 08/31/10 06:00 AM ET

The wealthiest members of Congress grew richer in 2009 even as the economy struggled to recover from a deep recession.

The 50 wealthiest lawmakers were worth almost $1.4 billion in 2009, about $85.1 million more than 12 months earlier, according to The Hill’s annual review of lawmakers’ financial disclosure forms.

Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) tops the list for the second year in a row. His minimum net worth was $188.6 million at the end of 2009, up by more than $20 million from 2008, according to his financial disclosure form.While the economy struggled through a recession during much of 2009 and the nation’s unemployment rate soared to 10 percent, the stock market rebounded, helping lawmakers with large investments. The S&P 500 rose by about 28 percent in 2009.

Total assets for the 50 wealthiest lawmakers in 2009 was $1.5 billion — that’s actually a nearly $36 million drop from a year ago. But lawmakers reduced their liabilities by even more, cutting debts by $120 million last year.

There are various reasons why asset values dropped. Some lawmakers saw their real estate holdings fall as the housing crisis intensified. A handful of lawmakers also had other investments or businesses that turned sour.

The only newcomer to the Top 10 list is Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Texas), who came straight in at No. 5. He replaced Rep. Harry Teague (D-N.M.), the 10th wealthiest member in 2008. Teague fell off the top 50 list after the value of a company he has a stake in — Teaco Energy Services Inc. — fell in value from $39.6 million in 2008 to at the least $1 million in 2009.

There were a few other new faces in the Top 50, including Rep. Patrick Kennedy (D-R.I.), who received an inheritance after his late father, Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.), died in 2009.

Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Rep. Tom Petri (R-Wis.) also made the list.

Twenty-seven Democrats along with 23 Republicans make up the 50 richest in Congress; 30 House members and 20 senators are on the list.

The bulk of Kerry’s wealth is credited to his spouse, Teresa Heinz Kerry, who inherited hundreds of millions of dollars after her late husband, the ketchup heir Sen. John Heinz (R-Pa.), died in a plane crash in 1991.

Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), with a net worth of $160.1 million, is the second-richest member of Congress under The Hill’s formula, even though his wealth declined by more than $4 million in 2009.

He is followed by Rep. Jane Harman (D-Calif.), who saw her net wealth leap to $152.3 million, a jump of more than $40 million from a year ago.

The rest of the top 10 are Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.), McCaul, Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.), Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.), Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-Fla.), Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) and Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.).

To calculate its rankings, The Hill used only the lawmakers’ financial disclosure forms that cover the 2009 calendar year.Lawmakers are only required to report their finances in broad ranges. For example, a $2.5 million vacation home in Aspen, Colo., would be reported as being valued at between $1 and $5 million on a congressional financial disclosure form.

To come up with the most conservative estimate for each lawmaker’s wealth, researchers took the bottom number of each range reported. Then, to calculate the minimum net worth for each senator and member, the sum of liabilities was subtracted from the sum of assets.

As a result, the methodology used to find the Top 50 wealthiest in Congress can miss some of the richest lawmakers.

Sen. Herb Kohl (D-Wis.) is certainly one of the wealthiest lawmakers on Capitol Hill. As owner of the NBA’s Milwaukee Bucks, Kohl has a $254 million asset on his hands, according to Forbes magazine.

But under The Hill’s methodology, his team ownership only counts for $50 million, the highest range reported on the congressional financial disclosure form. Because of high liabilities on his 2009 form, Kohl actually is listed as being more than $4.6 million in debt on the 2009 form.

The Hill’s 50 Wealthiest List

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