‘Bibi’ Ayesha, Mutilated Afghan Woman, Receives ‘Enduring Heart Award’

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Here’s a good comparison of Sharia Law and the love of a Christian Nation at work giving compassion to a stranger when her own  family wouldn’t help her.

Mutilated Afghan Woman, Receives ‘Enduring Heart Award’

After having her nose and ears cut off by her husband as a punishment handed down by Taliban elders, “Bibi” Ayesha was left for dead. The courageous young woman found her way to an American military hospital where she was treated for her wounds.

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No Social Security Increase for 2nd Year in Row (2011)

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What a joke this is. No inflation? When I compare prices of things even in Wal-mart, many things are up 20-50% in price from a couple of years ago. I was looking at the 20″ box fans in the spring that have been $10 forever, now they’re $16 and last winter the Vicks humidifiers that have been $10 as well forever are $13. Groceries, you can carry $50 worth out in one hand. When we got married 39 years ago $15 would do us the entire week, (now I realize I’m sounding like my grandparents used to sound to me, ha ha, but it’s the truth for you younger folks reading this). It’s a disgrace not to give our Senior citizens a COLA raise for the second year in a row and claim there is NO inflation insults our intelligence. (p.s…….I’m not drawing Social Security…………….yet.)

No Social Security Increase for 2nd Year in Row

AP) More than 58 million retirees and disabled Americans will get no increase in Social Security benefits next year, the second year in a row without a raise.

The Social Security Administration said Friday inflation has been too low since the last increase in 2009 to warrant an increase for 2011. The announcement marks only the second year without an increase since automatic adjustments for inflation were adopted in 1975. The first year was this year.

The cost-of-living adjustments, or COLAs, are automatically set each year by an inflation measure that was adopted by Congress back in the 1970s.

To make up for the lack of a COLA, the House will vote in November – after congressional elections – on a bill to provide $250 payments to Social Security recipients, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said. But even if Pelosi can get the House to pass the proposal, it faces opposition in the Senate.

The absence of inflation will be of small comfort to many older Americans whose savings and home values still haven’t recovered from the recession. Many haven’t had a raise since January 2009, and they won’t be getting one until at least January 2012. And the timing couldn’t be worse for Democrats as they approach an election in which they are in danger of losing their House majority and possibly their Senate majority as well.

CBSNews.com Special Report: Election 2010

“We’re a little bit upset because our bills are going up and our Social Security isn’t,” said Betty Dizik of Tamarac, Fla., a retired tax preparer and social worker.

Dizik, 83, said her only source of income is a $1,200 monthly payment from Social Security.

“I’m like a lot of other people in my predicament who live on Social Security,” Dizik said. “It’s hard. We cannot make ends meet.”

Claire Edelman of Monroe Township, N.J., said she was so hard up that at the age of 83 she applied for a temporary job as a census taker for the 2010 Census. She didn’t get the job, so she gets by on a small pension from her job with the state and her monthly Social Security payment of $1,060.

The average Social Security benefit: $1,072 a month.

Opinion: A Social Security Fix?

Social Security is supported by a 6.2 percent payroll tax – paid by both workers and employers – on wages up to $106,800. Because there is no COLA, that amount will remain unchanged for 2011. (This is the money put back in a LOCK BOX according to Al Gore)

The last increase in benefits came in 2009, when payments went up by 5.8 percent, the largest increase in 27 years. The big increase was caused by a sharp but short-lived spike in energy prices in 2008.

Gasoline prices topped $4 a gallon in the summer of 2008, jolting the inflation rate and resulting in the high COLA for 2009. When the price of gasoline subsequently fell below $2 a gallon, so did the overall inflation rate. (Oh,Please….don’t insult our intelligence) Seniors, however, kept the high COLA for 2009.

“They received a nearly 6 percent COLA for inflation that no longer really existed,” said Andrew Biggs, a former deputy commissioner at the Social Security Administration and now a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. (Now come on Mr Biggs!! “inflation that no longer really existed,”…come on now….since when do prices go up and then come down? Tell us now Mr. Biggs since your electric bill jumped a few years back, how much has it dropped  back down now that inflation no longer exists?)

“Seniors aren’t being treated unfairly, here,” Biggs said. “It looks bad, but they’re actually not being treated unfairly.

By law, the next increase won’t come until consumer prices rise above the level measured in 2008. The trustees who oversee Social Security project that will happen next year, resulting in an estimated 1.2 percent COLA for 2012.

Advocates for older Americans are pushing for some kind of payment to make up for the lack of a COLA.

CBS News

Another example of PC gone wrong

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I suppose now Merkel will be called Islamophobe.  It’s time to get over this political correctness of “mingling”.  The purpose of all the Muslims is to silently take over by assimilation of Sharia once large enough.  Be proud of your heritage, but the assimilation should be the other way around if you want to live in another country. Read this carefully, acceptance, dumbing down requirements, not requiring learning native tongue, etc…

By Sabine Siebold

POTSDAM, Germany (Reuters) – Germany’s attempt to create a multicultural society has “utterly failed,” Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Saturday, adding fuel to a debate over immigration and Islam polarising her conservative camp.

Speaking to a meeting of young members of her Christian Democrats (CDU), Merkel said allowing people of different cultural backgrounds to live side by side without integrating had not worked in a country that is home to some four million Muslims.

“This (multicultural) approach has failed, utterly failed,” Merkel told the meeting in Potsdam, south of Berlin.

Merkel faces pressure from within her CDU to take a tougher line on immigrants who don’t show a willingness to adapt to German society and her comments appeared intended to pacify her critics.

She said too little had been required of immigrants in the past and repeated her usual line that they should learn German in order to get by in school and have opportunities on the labour market.

The debate over foreigners in Germany has shifted since former central banker Thilo Sarrazin published a book accusing Muslim immigrants of lowering the intelligence of German society.

Sarrazin was censured for his views and dismissed from the Bundesbank, but his book proved highly popular and polls showed a majority of Germans agreed with the thrust of his arguments.

Merkel has tried to accommodate both sides of the debate, talking tough on integration but also telling Germans that they must accept that mosques have become part of their landscape.

She said on Saturday that the education of unemployed Germans should take priority over recruiting workers from abroad, while noting Germany could not get by without skilled foreign workers.

In a weekend newspaper interview, her Labour Minister Ursula von der Leyen (CDU) raised the possibility of lowering barriers to entry for some foreign workers in order to fight the lack of skilled workers in Europe’s largest economy.

“For a few years, more people have been leaving our country than entering it,” she told the Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung. “Wherever it is possible, we must lower the entry hurdles for those who bring the country forward.”

The German Chamber of Industry and Commerce (DIHK) says Germany lacks about 400,000 skilled workers.

Yet Horst Seehofer, chairman of the Christian Social Union (CSU), the CDU’s sister party, has rejected any relaxation of immigration laws and said last week there was no room in Germany for more people from “alien cultures.

Pollsters say Congress will have a Bigger Change

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by  John Gizzi, Human Events on Line
10/16/2010

Newport Beach, Calif.—Nationally-recognized pollster Scott Rasmussen last night predicted that Republicans would gain 55 seats in races for the U.S. House of Representatives November 2—much more than the 39 needed for a Republican majority in the House for the first time since 2006.

But the man whose Rasmussen Reports polling is watched carefully by politicians and frequently quoted by the punditocracy said that whether Republicans gain the ten seats they need to take control of the Senate is in question.

“Republicans should have 48 seats [after the elections next month], Democrats 47, and five seats could slide either way,” said Rasmussen in his banquet address at the Western Conservative Political Action Conference. He was referring to seats in five states in which the Senate race this year he considers too close to call: California, Illinois, Washington, West Virginia, and Nevada (or “that mudwrestling contest,” as Rasmussen described the race between Republican Sharron Angle and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid).

In recent years, Rasmussen has gained widespread attention for being the first to forecast Scott Brown’s dramatic win in the special Massachusetts Senate race in January (the major networks never knew it was a competitive race until the weekend before the election) and the political vulnerability among Pennsylvania Republicans of Sen. Arlen Specter (who later switched to Democrat and lost his new party’s primary in May of this year).

Rasmussen also brought out some intriguing survey figures regarding the economy for the Western CPAC crowd at the Radisson Hotel here in Newport Beach.

Noting that the top three issues this election year are “one-the economy, two-the economy, and three-the economy,” Rasmussen said his polls show overwhelming support among voters nationwide for cutting spending, taxes, and the deficit.

“And by two-to-one, voters say they prefer a congressman who will reduce overall spending to one who promises to bring a ‘fair share’ of government spending to their congressional district,” the veteran pollster said, adding that a plurality of Texas voters backed Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s recent decision to turn down federal dollars a program because federal strings were attached to it.

The Republicans’ strong position three weeks before midterm elections began, Rasmussen recalled, “when every Republican [in the House] said they would oppose the stimulus package. That’s when the generic ballot [showing support for Republican and Democrat candidates nationwide] started to go up.” He also noted that support fell dramatically for the Democratic healthcare reform bill “when the CBO [Congressional Budget Office] figures showed it would cost more than a trillion dollars.
And support for it never recovered.”

Voter nervousness about the economy, Rasmussen noted, is clear in the declining number of people he finds who feel their own finances are “in good order.” Two years ago, he recalled, 43% of Americans felt their finances were in good order, 38% felt this way the day Barack Obama was elected, and 35% felt that way on the day he took office as President.

“At the beginning of the year, that figure dropped to 32%,” he added, “and today, it is down to 30%.” Rasmussen also said that more than half of homeowners are “unsure if their home is worth more than their mortgage.”

Noting how he periodically polls about different terms—conservative and liberal, for example—Rasmussen said that the term packing the most response is “tea party.”

“It generates the strongest reaction, both positive and negative, among voters,” he concluded, “It’s a defining force.”

CNBC predicts Congress will retroactively legalize foreclosure fraud

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Here’s an interesting article about CNBC and their predictions on what will happen with the Foreclosure fraud going on now.

CNBC predicts Congress will retroactively legalize foreclosure fraud

Congress will pass a bill to “forgive” banks the potentially criminal errors made in foreclosure proceedings, a senior CNBC editor predicts.

 CNBC predicts Congress will retroactively legalize foreclosure fraud

In a blog column Friday, John Carney argues that lawmakers in DC won’t allow the country’s largest issuers of mortgages to suffer financial losses following revelations of numerous mishandled foreclosure proceedings, especially when bailing them out this time “won’t cost taxpayers a dime.”

Here’s what is going to happen: Congress will pass a law called something like “The Financial Modernization and Stability Act of 2010” that will retroactively grant mortgage pools the rights in the underlying mortgages that people are worried about. All the screwed up paperwork, lost notes, unassigned security interests will be forgiven by a legislative act….

The [foreclosure] crisis is not driven by economics. It is driven by legal rights. And there’s simply zero probability that the politicians in Washington are going to let Bank of America or Citigroup or JP Morgan Chase fail because of a legal issue.

Carney predicts that the lame-duck session of Congress following this November’s elections will pass the law. “Every member of Congress … who has been voted out of office will cast a vote for the bill. And the President will sign it.”

Major banks’ stocks have suffered losses this week as an increasingly large body of evidence has emerged suggesting that banks and their contractors may not have done the most basic vetting of foreclosure paperwork, instead using “robo-signers” to rubber-stamp whatever foreclosure applications were brought forward.

The Associated Press reported this week:

In an effort to rush through thousands of home foreclosures since 2007, financial institutions and their mortgage servicing departments hired hair stylists, Walmart floor workers and people who had worked on assembly lines and installed them in “foreclosure expert” jobs with no formal training, a Florida lawyer says.

In depositions released Tuesday, many of those workers testified that they barely knew what a mortgage was. Some couldn’t define the word “affidavit.” Others didn’t know what a complaint was, or even what was meant by personal property. Most troubling, several said they knew they were lying when they signed the foreclosure affidavits and that they agreed with the defense lawyers’ accusations about document fraud.

The result has been a steady stream of allegations of wrongly foreclosed homes. In one notorious incident last month, a Florida man who had bought his home for cash and carried no mortgage was stunned to find his home in foreclosure. In another incident, a woman who was behind on payments but not in foreclosure called 911 when she heard what she thought was a burglar, but was in fact a JPMorgan contractor coming to change the locks on her home.

In many instances, those shortcuts and mistakes may have violated laws. Attorneys general in all 50 states have now launched probes into foreclosure practices. Bank of America has halted foreclosure proceedings in all states, while Ally Financial (formerly GMAC), JPMorgan and others have announced partial suspensions.

Carney admits that, with outrage growing over unscrupulous foreclosure practices, a second bailout of banks would be politically unpopular.

“Will the public be outraged?” he writes. “Probably. Financial bloggers will scream from the high heavens against another bailout of the banksters. Congress may try to create some cost for banks in exchange for the forgiveness, perhaps requiring more mortgage modifications. But the much feared [foreclosure] apocalypse will be laid to rest.”

Raw Story