What these people don’t understand is that Treaties don’t override the Constitution, they must abide by it as well….if not the Treaty is unconstitutional.

Do you want to know what country produced the food you eat? Too bad, says the World Trade Organization (WTO). That’s a barrier to free trade, so you don’t get to know.

The US instituted a labeling law requiring that all foods’ country of origin be on the label; it was part of the 2008 Farm Bill. Canada and Mexico complained to the WTO, saying that it would discourage food imports. It took three years, but the WTO decided that labeling food with its country of origin is a “technical barrier to trade”.  In 1979, the US signed a treaty that includes prevention of technical barriers to trade. Of course, that term was not fully

WTO No!Do you want to defined. It was up to the WTO to say just what it means. And they’ve done just that in regard to food—though for some inexplicable reason, meat is not included. Therefore, country of origin labeling can continue with meat.

But if you’d like to know that the honey on a supermarket shelf did not come from China— where much of it is produced by badly abused bees, is often contaminated with lead, may contain an antibiotic, and sometimes doesn’t even contain any honey—well, that’s just too bad. You don’t have a right to know.

Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) is not cool to the WTO.  You see, COOL is a TBT, a technical barrier to trade. The United States of America, along with virtually all other nations of the world, has signed treaties with the WTO that give it authority over matters of trade—authority to say what is and is not legal inside countries if the issue affects trade. At the moment, this ruling affects only the US, but it obviously will not be limited to it.

Nearly every nation of the world has handed over its sovereignty to the WTO. Click here to see a world map showing the nations that do and don’t belong to the WTO.

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