“President Barack Obama has continued the secret policy of destroying the sovereignty and wealth of the United States to the benefit of the private transnational interests who control the United Nations, the CIA, Wall Street, and the global banking system.”

Saman Mohammadi wrote the above when he declared Barack Obama to be the first United Nations president back in May.

Somehow then, it should be no surprise that the United Nations would come to the president’s aid to help ensure he does not lose this election day.

Yesterday The Hill reported that 44 UN-affiliated “observers” will be stationed at polling places across the U.S. this November “looking for voter suppression activities by conservative groups.”

Because the ACLU and other organizations sent a letter claiming they feared “a coordinated political effort to disenfranchise millions of Americans” from the political right, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), a UN partner, has decided to send their monitors to our polls.

The lead-up to this year’s election has, in many ways, been unprecedented. The UN and its subgroups know they have zero jurisdiction over U.S. elections, but that isn’t stopping them from getting involved anyway.

The request for foreign monitoring of election sites drew a strong rebuke from Catherine Engelbrecht, founder and president of True the Vote, a conservative-leaning group seeking to crack down on election fraud.

“These activist groups sought assistance not from American sources, but from the United Nations,” she said in a statement to The Hill. “The United Nations has no jurisdiction over American elections.”

Neil Simon, director of communications for the OSCE’s parliamentary assembly, agreed the U.N. does not have jurisdiction over U.S. elections but noted all OSCE member counties, which include the United States, have committed since 1990 to hold free and democratic elections and to allow one another to observe their elections.

The observers, from countries such as Germany, France, Serbia, Belarus, Ukraine and Kazakhstan, will observe voting at polling places and other political activity.

“They [will] observe the overall election process, not just the ballot casting,” said Giovanna Maiola, spokeswoman for OSCE. “They are focusing on a number of areas on the state level, including the legal system, election administration, the campaign, the campaign financing [and] new voting technologies used in the different states.”

In a follow-up e-mail, Maiola noted that it is a limited election-observation mission. She said “the OSCE has regularly been invited to observe elections in the United States, in line with OSCE commitments.”

Access of international observers during voting is explicitly allowed in some states such as Missouri, South Dakota, North Dakota and New Mexico.

“State law does not generally provide for international observers,” Maiola said. “However, through our contacts at state and county level in certain states, we managed to secure invitations at local level and we have taken up the offer to observe. Where this is not possible, we will respect the state regulation on this matter and will not observe in precincts on Election Day.”

International observers will follow up on the concerns raised by civil rights groups.

“We attended their meeting, we took note of the issued they raised and we asked our observers in the field to follow up on them,” said Maiola.

The Hill