STUDY: What Are the Most, Least Free States in the United States?

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A new study by a Libertarian think tank called the Mercatus Center at George Mason University ranks the 50 states in order of personal freedoms. There’s a chart on the website, that I couldn’t transfer here.

A new study by a Libertarian think tank called the Mercatus Center at George Mason University ranks the 50 states in order of personal freedoms. So, how does your state stack up? Judge Andrew Napolitano reveals that the most free states are North Dakota, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and New Hampshire. The least free are New York, New Jersey, California, Hawaii, and Rhode Island.

The study determined the rankings based on “the laws that the states impose that regulate personal, private behavior.”

According to Napolitano the results of the study are mixed. “The bad news is that there are states like New York, New York City, where the government thinks it can regulate private behavior. The good news is, as Ronald Reagan used to say, you can still vote with your feet. If you think the taxes are too high in New Jersey, you can move to Pennsylvania.”

Fox Insider

 

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Reid’s Gun Control Bill Makes a Missing Firearm a Ticket to Five Years in Prison

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Reid’s bill will go nowhere with this type crap in it. More nonsense from the progressive/Marxist left in the Democratic party.

Under Senator Harry Reid’s (D-NV) gun control bill (S. 649), if somebody steals your firearm or you lose it, you can go to prison for up to five years if you have not reported the theft or loss to local police and to Attorney General Eric Holder within 24 hours.

The provision merits ridicule for treating as a felon someone who misplaces a firearm and does not report it to the police and the federal government fast enough.

Section 123 of the Reid bill adds a new provision to section 922 of title 18 of the U.S. Code:

It shall be unlawful for any person who lawfully possesses or owns a firearm that has been shipped or transported in, or has been possessed in or affecting, interstate or foreign commerce, to fail to report the theft or loss of the firearm, within 24 hours after the person discovers the theft or loss, to the Attorney General and to the appropriate local authorities.

It also amends section 924 of title 18 so that a violation of the 24-hour reporting requirement committed “knowingly” is punishable by up to five years in prison or a criminal fine, or both. To punish someone who “knowingly” violates the 24-hour rule might sound reasonable to some people—until you know what a lawyer means by the word “knowingly” when it comes to a criminal statute.

The Supreme Court said in Bryan v. U.S. in 1994 that when a federal statute punishes someone for a crime committed “willfully,” the federal government must prove at trial that the individual knew that his conduct was unlawful. However, the Court also said that, when the statute provides that the government must prove merely that the crime was committed “knowingly,” the government does not have to prove that the individual knew that his or her conduct was unlawful. Thus, an individual who knew his or her gun was missing and did not report it to local authorities and the Attorney General in 24 hours would potentially face five years in prison.

It is not reasonable to send an individual to prison for up to five years for failing to tell local authorities and the federal government, within 24 hours, that his or her firearm is lost or was stolen, given that a reasonable person would never know that failure to make such a report, let alone within 24 hours, is a crime. Even someone who has the presence of mind to report promptly to local police or the sheriff’s office that a firearm is missing would be highly unlikely to know that such a report to local authorities was not good enough and that he or she must tell the Attorney General of the United States, too.

It is one thing to assign a legal duty to a firearms owner to report missing firearms, but it is quite another thing to exercise the draconian power of the federal government to make failing in that duty a federal crime. It is doubly inappropriate to give someone prison time for failing to tell the Attorney General that his or her gun was missing, when no reasonable person would know that failing to make such a report within 24 hours was a federal crime.

Also, the drafters of the legislation failed to take sufficiently into account the nature of rural life and hunting in the United States. Some people who own firearms within the United States do not have the ability to communicate with anybody (let alone the Attorney General of the United States) within 24 hours—think, for example, of a hunter deep in the wilds of Alaska who loses a firearm in a river.

Under no circumstances should Congress make it a federal crime to fail to report a missing firearm within 24 hours to local authorities and the Attorney General. It is an unreasonable use of power to define as a federal crime conduct that no reasonable person would know was a federal crime.

Heritage blog

Congresswoman Does Not Realize the ‘Assault Magazines’ She Wants to Ban Are Reusable

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These are the people making our laws in DC…..

Rep. Diana DeGette (D-Colo.) is the chief co-sponsor, with Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-N.Y.), of the High Capacity Ammunition Feeding Device Act, which would ban the sale or transfer of magazines that can hold more than 10 rounds. Upon reintroducing the bill in January, she said banning what she calls “assault magazines” would “go a long way toward making our country safe.” If DeGette seems overly optimistic about the potential impact of her legislation, especially given the fact that many millions of “high-capacity ammunition feeding devices” would remain in circulation, perhaps that’s because she does not realize magazines are reusable. At a Denver Post forum on gun control yesterday, DeGette explained why she thinks her bill would be effective:

What’s the efficacy of banning these magazine clips? I will tell you these are ammunition, they’re bullets, so the people who have those now, they’re going to shoot them. And so if you ban them in the future, the number of these high-capacity magazines is going to decrease dramatically over time because the bullets will have been shot and there won’t be any more available.

Reason.com

Medicaid Expansion: A Disaster in the Making

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Here’s a clip from Mike Maharrey from 10th amendment center. I’ve come to know Mike in the last fews weeks, he’s a great guy and full of knowledge about the founders and history. He explains what will happen to States like Tennessee if they take the money and later it is cut off, which as Steve explains always happens. State Senator John Stevens told me the local Camden hospital was pushing for the expansion. I believe our local hospital is owned by one of the Jackson Hospitals.

Tenth Amendment Center communications director Mike Maharrey discusses attempts in Arkansas, and other states, to go ahead with Medicaid expansion on the Paul Harrell Program (KBTM 1230 AM Jonesboro, Ark.

Maharrey notes pressure and money thrown around by large insurance and health care companies is even driving so-called conservatives to embrace Medicaid expansion, and through it, entrenchment of Obamacare in the U.S.

“Our position at the Tenth Amendment Center is that we need to do everything we can to keep this thing (Obamacare) from getting its tenitcals into the system. We need to force the federal government to back off of this horrible health care plan and we need to go back and start looking at free market solutions and state-based solutions where states actually have some control and aren’t being dictated everything by the feds.”

Tenth Amendment Center