Costco — the Bible is fiction

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  • 660-Costco-Bible.jpg
    Courtesy Caleb Kaltenbach

 

What do the Bible, “The Hunger Games” and “Fifty Shades of Grey” have in common? All three are works of fiction, according to the booksellers at Costco.

 

Pastor Caleb Kaltenbach made that shocking discovery last Friday as he was shopping for a present for his wife at a Costco in Simi Valley, Calif.

 

“All the Bibles were labeled as fiction,” the pastor told me. “It seemed bizarre to me.”

 

Kaltenbach is the lead pastor at Discovery Church, a non-denominational Christian congregation in southern California.

 

He thought there must be some sort of mistake so he scoured the shelf for other Bibles. Every copy was plastered with a sticker that read, “$14.99 Fiction.”

 

Kaltenbach thought there must be some sort of mistake so he scoured the shelf for other Bibles. Every copy was plastered with a sticker that read, “$14.99 Fiction.”

 

The pastor knew something must be amiss so he set off in search of a Costco employee hoping for an answer. Unfortunately, he couldn’t find anyone willing to answer his question (which is not all that surprising if you’ve shopped at Costco).

Costco — the Bible is fiction | Fox News.

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Tennesseans might know Tuesday if they can keep canceled health insurance

Comments Off on Tennesseans might know Tuesday if they can keep canceled health insurance

Tennessee residents who lost their health insurance because of Obamacare could know before Wednesday whether they will get it back — if only for another year.

Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak is reviewing President Obama’s policy change, announced late last week, said TDCI spokeswoman Kate Abernathy.

“We are still in the process of weighing a decision, but I expect that we will have a decision in the coming days, probably as early as Tuesday morning,” Abernathy told Tennessee Watchdog.

MCPEAK: Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak

McPeak is still receiving guidance from officials with the federal Department of Health and Human Services, Abernathy said.

Florida, Ohio, California, Texas and Kentucky have all confirmed they will allow the one-year policy extension. Washington, Delaware, Oregon, Arkansas and Vermont, though, will not allow the extension, and that means all previously continued policies in those states will remain canceled, Abernathy said.

If McPeak allows the one-year extension for Tennessee, private insurers may have to change their platforms and work to implement further structural changes.

Gary Tanner, spokesman for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee, the state’s largest insurer, told Tennessee Watchdog on Monday the company is willing and prepared to go along with even further changes.

As was reported last week, Obama announced that state insurance commissioners will have the authority to allow for previously canceled policies to be resold in their respective markets.

– See more at: http://tennessee.watchdog.org/2013/11/18/tennesseans-might-know-tuesday-if-they-can-keep-canceled-health-insurance/#sthash.T0OyR0o9.dpuf

Tennessee residents who lost their health insurance because of Obamacare could know before Wednesday whether they will get it back — if only for another year.

Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak is reviewing President Obama’s policy change, announced late last week, said TDCI spokeswoman Kate Abernathy.

“We are still in the process of weighing a decision, but I expect that we will have a decision in the coming days, probably as early as Tuesday morning,” Abernathy told Tennessee Watchdog.

McPeak is still receiving guidance from officials with the federal Department of Health and Human Services, Abernathy said.

Florida, Ohio, California, Texas and Kentucky have all confirmed they will allow the one-year policy extension. Washington, Delaware, Oregon, Arkansas and Vermont, though, will not allow the extension, and that means all previously continued policies in those states will remain canceled, Abernathy said.

If McPeak allows the one-year extension for Tennessee, private insurers may have to change their platforms and work to implement further structural changes.

Gary Tanner, spokesman for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee, the state’s largest insurer, told Tennessee Watchdog on Monday the company is willing and prepared to go along with even further changes.

As was reported last week, Obama announced that state insurance commissioners will have the authority to allow for previously canceled policies to be resold in their respective markets.

Contact Christopher Butler at chris@tennesseewatchdog.org.

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Tennesseans might know Tuesday if they can keep canceled health insurance.